Top Frugal Habits and The Right of Money

Many of our grandparents were born between 1910 and 1925. This is what Tom Brokaw dubbed “The Greatest Generation” when America was developed and defended on the backbones of its hard-working citizens. Anyone with silver hair, no matter their birth date, has spent an entire lifetime making choices and reaping consequences. It is our choice whether or not we will learn from our grandparents’ experiences and advice. That is why I’ve comprised a list of frugal habits I’ve learned from watching my own grandparents as a child.

It only just dawned on me that I’ve been learning from their example all of my life even though they’ve all passed on.

Even my grandpa “Big John,” who passed away from a heart attack when I was four, left a legacy in his community as a reliable and trustworthy man others looked to for business advice. Things like that, 25 years later, stay with me.

I titled this piece “Grandma’s Top 10 Frugal Habits” because many of us had “that grandma” who wore the same three outfits and that one pair of shoes.

But this list will also include other grandparents who had a powerful influence in my life.

 

1. Driving a used car.

My grandma Dorris drove the same used car through my entire childhood. It wasn’t new or flashy, but it was nice, reliable, and paid for.

 

2. Gardening

My grandpa Lloyd plowed Michigan soil every season of his adult life. In retirement, his favorite pastime was taking care of his beautiful garden.

Grandma Dorris and I spent time picking and snapping green beans straight from her garden into the dinner pot.

When I graduated from high school, grandma sent me a letter with two packets of seeds to start my own garden. That was my grandparents’ legacy.

 

3. Scratch and dent.

Grandma helped me shift my mindset and think about things like manager’s specials and clearance racks. She went a bit too far some days, coming home with food that looked like it was ready to crawl out and burrow itself into the ground, but the lesson was still valuable.

I probably won’t hunt for nearly spoiled food and cereal boxes that look like they’ve been flattened by a forklift. Still, finding food on sale because of a simple blemish or dent is a win in my book.